• Sam Harris

    Lead Fellow

    Sam Harris is a Ph.D. candidate in the Department of Near Eastern Languages and Civilizations studying archaeology. He is the Mesopotamian Content Specialist for the Education Department at the Oriental Institute and a NELC BA preceptor. He researches the late prehistory and early history of Mesopotamia, with a focus on household economies and foodways. In addition to teaching classes on Mesopotamian archaeology, Near Eastern mythology, and Hittite history, he has worked as an Arabic instructor at the George Washington University, Georgetown University, and the University of Chicago. As a Peace Corps volunteer in the Republic of Georgia he worked as a primary and secondary English language educator. As a CCT Fellow, Sam is grateful for the opportunity to work with graduate students to develop pedagogical skills and explore ways of effectively teaching students from a variety of backgrounds.

  • Nick Kryczka

    Senior CCT Fellow

    Nick is a Ph.D. candidate in the Department of History. Before coming to the University of Chicago, Nick worked for ten years as a teacher in the Chicago Public Schools. As an instructor and course lead, he taught history and sociology and developed high school curriculum in historical literacy and social science research. Here at University of Chicago, Nick has interned in the America in World Civilizations Core and worked as a TA in the history department’s Black Chicago course. This year, Nick is a preceptor for BA candidates in History. As a CCT Fellow, Nick looks forward to bringing a K-16 education perspective to history pedagogy in his department.

  • Woo Chan (Chaz) Lee

    Senior CCT Fellow

    Woo Chan (Chaz) is a Ph.D. candidate at the Department of Music. At the University of Chicago, Chaz has lectured in the Civilizations Core and Arts Core and also taught as a Writing Intern in the Humanities Core and Lector in the Writing Program's course on academic and professional writing. He is interested in exploring the intersecting and divergent temporalities of classroom teaching, research/writing, and direct action. As one of the co-coordinators of the Race and Pedagogy Working Group (along with fellow CCT Fellow Amanda Shubert), he is also interested in developing a community of teachers and researchers dedicated to racial justice at University of Chicago.

  • Carmen Merport

    Senior CCT Fellow

    Carmen is a Ph.D. candidate in the department of English. Her fields of study include twentieth-century American literature and visual culture, contemporary art history, and cultural studies. Working in these fields has led to her commitment to developing inclusive, interdisciplinary, and collaborative teaching practices. As a Senior CCT fellow, she hopes to facilitate the creation of spaces in which graduate student teachers can work together to refine their pedagogical skills and tackle barriers to inclusive teaching.

  • Amanda Shubert

    Senior CCT Fellow

    Amanda is a Ph.D. candidate in the Department of English. Before coming to the University of Chicago, she worked in museum curatorship and academic outreach, teaching object-oriented sessions in the galleries and Print Study Room to college groups. As a CCT Fellow, Amanda strives to create an inclusive and collaborative workshop environment in which graduate student teachers can tackle everyday challenges in the classroom. Past programs include sessions on Teaching Race in the Literature Classroom, How to Facilitate Discussion and a Critical Pedagogy Reading Group on the works of Paolo Freire and bell hooks. This year, Amanda is a co-coordinator of the Race and Pedagogy Working Group.

  • Mohamed Abdelhafez

    CCT Fellow

    Mohamed is a Ph.D. candidate in the Department of Physics working in the field of quantum computing. His main research is investigating the best ways to control the small units of data in a quantum computer and make them perform the needed computations. He is very passionate about teaching and has been a TA for many physics courses over three years where his approach is student based learning that takes into consideration how students learn in different ways. He also likes to teach physics in a story telling approach where the seemingly different parts of one course are all merged together into one smooth big picture. He was awarded the 2016 Wayne C. Booth award for excellence in teaching and hopes to continue developing and utilizing his teaching approaches through being a CCT fellow.

  • Ashley Cureton Turner

    CCT Fellow

    Ashley is a Ph.D. candidate at the School of Social Service Administration (SSA). She is also pursuing a Graduate Certificate in Human Rights Studies. Her fields of study include international social work, refugee resettlement, adolescent development, schooling among disadvantaged populations, and school-based interventions. At University of Chicago, Ashley has served as a TA for an urban education policy course and contemporary issues in human rights, as well as a lecturer for a course on life course development. She also serves as an instructor and coordinator for a study abroad exchange program through SSA and the Tata Institute of Social Sciences (TISS) in Mumbai, India. Moreover, she facilitates courses around service learning and civic engagement among high school students through Northwestern University's Civic Education Project. Ashley is particularly interested in developing pedagogical tools specific to social work and other professional fields.

  • Christian Ferko

    CCT Fellow

    Christian is a Ph.D. candidate in the Department of Physics, where he thinks about questions in string theory and supergravity. He has served as a teaching assistant at Harvard and for several physics courses at the University of Chicago, and worked as a CCT Teaching Consultant before joining the Fellows program. Christian is passionate about physics education research, evidence-based teaching techniques, classroom technologies, and active learning strategies, and hopes to share some of these ideas with other graduate instructors through the Fellow position.

  • Maeve Hooper

    CCT Fellow

    Maeve is a Ph.D. candidate in the Department of Germanic Studies, where she studies nineteenth century novellas and frame narratives. She began teaching stand-alone courses in the University’s German language program in 2011, and has since designed and taught her own syllabi for second- and third-year level language and literature courses. In the summer of 2017, Maeve developed a new intensive beginning language sequence that will be piloted in the German department during the 2017-2018 academic year. In addition to her work in foreign language instruction and acquisition, Maeve also worked as a Teaching Consultant at the Chicago Center for Teaching for several years before becoming a Teaching Fellow. In 2017, Maeve was awarded the Wayne C. Booth Prize for Excellence in Graduate Student Teaching.

  • Jaeseung Kim

    CCT Fellow

    Jaeseung is a Ph.D. candidate at the School of Social Service Administration (SSA). His research interest is in poverty, work-family polices, and family well-being. Jaeseung has served a TA for several courses (e.g., Policies and Programs and Economics for Social Welfare) as well as a lecturer for a Research Methods course for SSA students. His passion for teaching and advancing his pedagogical skills has led to a CCT fellow, where he hopes to serve as a liaison between the SSA and other departments and to build a teaching network across campus.

  • Katharine Mershon

    CCT Fellow

    Katharine is a Ph.D. candidate in Religion, Literature, and Visual Culture in the Divinity School. Her research focuses on how religion intersects with questions of race, gender, and animality in contemporary American culture. At the University of Chicago, Katharine has worked as a stand-alone instructor, course assistant, and writing intern in the Humanities Core. In addition, Katharine taught a self-designed course in the English department at Lake Forest College. She was awarded the 2016-2017 Alma Wilson Teaching Fellowship for her course on Animals, Religion, and Ethics, and recently received the Divinity School’s 2017 Prize for Excellence in Teaching. Informed by her areas of study, as a CCT Fellow, Katharine plans to facilitate programs for graduate students that help them to create accessible and inclusive classroom environments.

  • Nicole Erin Morse

    CCT Fellow

    Nicole is a Ph.D. candidate at the University of Chicago in the Department of Cinema and Media Studies, writing a dissertation titled Selfie Aesthetics: Form, Performance, and Transfeminist Politics in Self-Representational Art. Nicole’s research considers questions of authorship and spectatorship in television, pornography, new media, and social media, with articles published in Porn Studies, Feminist Media Studies, and Jump Cut. As a CCT Fellow, Nicole is interested in developing resources on practice-based assignments for arts courses.

  • Mary Robertson

    CCT Fellow

    Mary is a Ph.D. candidate in Anthropology. Her research explores race, class and gender in South Africa through the lens of advertising and branding, which she draws on in fostering diversity and creating an inclusive classroom. She has taught in multiple university contexts in both the US and South Africa in the disciplines of anthropology, ethnomusicology, as well as in the Core at the University of Chicago, and as a CCT Fellow, has particular interest in developing interdisciplinary collaborations in teaching.