• Sam Harris

    Lead CCT Fellow

    Sam Harris is a Ph.D. candidate in the Department of Near Eastern Languages and Civilizations studying archaeology. He is the Mesopotamian Content Specialist for the Education Department at the Oriental Institute and a NELC BA preceptor. He researches the late prehistory and early history of Mesopotamia, with a focus on household economies and foodways. In addition to teaching classes on Mesopotamian archaeology, Near Eastern mythology, and Hittite history, he has worked as an Arabic instructor at the George Washington University, Georgetown University, and the University of Chicago. As a Peace Corps volunteer in the Republic of Georgia he worked as a primary and secondary English language educator. As a CCT Fellow, Sam is grateful for the opportunity to work with graduate students to develop pedagogical skills and explore ways of effectively teaching students from a variety of backgrounds.

  • Ashley Cureton Turner

    Senior CCT Fellow

    Ashley is a PhD candidate at the School of Social Service Administration (SSA) where she focuses on school engagement among Muslim refugee youth and their families. She is also pursuing a Graduate Certificate in Human Rights Studies. At the University of Chicago, Ashley has served as a TA for an urban education policy course and contemporary issues in human rights, as well as a lecturer for a course on life course development. She also serves as an instructor and coordinator for a study abroad exchange program through SSA and the Tata Institute of Social Sciences (TISS) in Mumbai, India, and facilitates courses around service learning and civic engagement among high school students through Northwestern University's Civic Education Project. In 2018, she was selected to teach a stand-alone course on human rights issues among child migrants for UChicago’s Pozen Family Center for Human Rights. Ashley is particularly interested in developing pedagogical tools specific to social work and other professional fields.

  • Nick Kryczka

    Senior CCT Fellow

    Nick is a PhD candidate in the Department of History, where he researches the history of education, urban history, and the history of racial ideology in the late twentieth-century United States. His dissertation traces the role of voluntary school desegregation in shaping urban multiculturalism in Chicago's post-civil rights era. Before coming to the University of Chicago, Nick worked for ten years as a teacher in the Chicago Public Schools. As an instructor and course lead, he taught history and sociology and developed high school curriculum in historical literacy and social science research. Here at UChicago, Nick has interned in the America in World Civilizations Core, worked as a TA in the History department’s Black Chicago course, and taught as a preceptor for BA candidates in History. This is Nick's third year as a CCT fellow, and he looks forward to continuing to bring a K-16 history pedagogy perspectives to his colleagues in the History Department. This year, Nick is also a National Academy of Education/Spencer Dissertation Fellow.

  • Mary Robertson

    Senior CCT Fellow

    Mary is a PhD candidate in Anthropology. Her research explores race, class, and gender in South Africa through the lens of advertising and branding, which she draws on in fostering diversity and creating an inclusive classroom. She has taught in multiple university contexts in both the US and South Africa in the disciplines of anthropology, ethnomusicology, as well as in the Core at the University of Chicago. As a CCT Fellow, Mary has particular interest in developing interdisciplinary collaborations in teaching.

  • George Adams

    CCT Fellow

    George is a PhD candidate in the Department of Music. As a performer, he has played the viola in orchestras and chamber ensembles, directed and sung in chamber and concert choirs, and currently sings in the Early Music Ensemble. His dissertation project is on the analysis of new and experimental musical repertories from interdisciplinary perspectives, with a particular interest in conceptualism in music and the visual arts. As a CCT fellow, George is committed to fostering inclusive pedagogical approaches to subjects that may seem inaccessible to students and teachers alike. Reading and writing in musical notation, for example, often acts as a “language barrier” to his home discipline of music theory. Through critical reflection on disciplinary methodology and effective use of technology in teaching practices, he hopes to help facilitate open and inclusive classrooms in music and the humanities.

  • Nicole Beckmann Tessel

    CCT Fellow

    Nicole is a PhD candidate in the Department of History in the field of Islamic Civilizations. Nicole's experiences as both a student and teacher in England and Turkey sparked her interests in bilingual, international, and comparative education. At UChicago, Nicole has taught as a Writing Intern in the Humanities Core and as a Teaching Assistant in the Social Sciences Core and the East Asian Civilizations sequence. Last year, Nicole was a preceptor for BA candidates in History. She has also taught a self-designed course in international history at the School of the Art Institute of Chicago. As a CCT Fellow, Nicole aims to formalize efforts to articulate and share best practices amongst preceptors, and to help facilitate teaching opportunities at high schools for interested graduate students.

  • Rebecca Ewert

    CCT Fellow

    Rebecca is a PhD student in the Department of Sociology. She researches masculinity and health, with a focus on the way rural people develop ideas about health and engage in health behaviors. At the University of Chicago, Rebecca has taught as a Writing Intern in the Humanities Core and worked as a TA in the Sociology department’s “Crime and the City” course. Rebecca is also a preceptor for BA candidates in Sociology. As a CCT Fellow, Rebecca is committed to developing inclusive and interdisciplinary teaching practices across University contexts. She is especially interested in developing student-centered curricula that provide opportunities for students at all levels to develop research literacy and produce independent research projects.

  • Robert Gruener

    CCT Fellow

    Robert is a PhD candidate in the Biomedical Science's Committee on Cancer Biology. Robert's research focuses on identifying and evaluating novel therapies for the treatment of breast cancers. As a teaching assistant at the University of Chicago, Robert won his department's Excellence in Teaching Assistant Award. His focus during his CCT Fellowship will be on the role of technology in the classroom and its potential for creating inclusive teaching in STEM.

  • Ashley Guo

    CCT Fellow

    Ashley is a PhD candidate in the Institute for Molecular Engineering. Her research focuses on using molecular simulations to study biological and bio-inspired macromolecules and developing new molecular simulation methods. At the University of Chicago, Ashley has served as a TA in the IME and co-founded a chapter of the Society of Women Engineers. She is committed to creating inclusive and collaborative learning environments and promoting diversity in STEM. As a CCT Fellow, Ashley is looking forward to working together with graduate student instructors to develop pedagogical skills and foster inclusive teaching on campus.

  • Nell Hawley

    CCT Fellow

    Nell is a PhD candidate in South Asian Languages and Civilizations, where she studies Sanskrit literature. She has worked with the CCT as a Teaching Consultant since 2015 and is delighted to continue supporting the UChicago teaching community as a CCT Fellow in 2018–19. At UChicago, Nell has taught self-designed courses in Sanskrit at the elementary and intermediate levels. This spring, she will be teaching a new course, called "Yoga: Texts, Practices, Politics," about the intellectual and cultural history of yoga. Before coming to Chicago, Nell worked as an after-school educator and college writing tutor in New York City.

  • Jenn M. Jackson

    CCT Fellow

    Jenn is a PhD candidate in Political Science who also holds a Graduate Certificate in Gender and Sexuality Studies from the Center for the Study of Gender and Sexuality. Jenn’s research interests include Black Politics, political behavior, news media and public opinion, and gender & sexuality. In her dissertation, Jenn interrogates the role of threat in influencing Black Americans’ political action. Before entering graduate school, Jenn was an adjunct instructor of courses like Black Politics and Political Science Research Methods at California State University, Fullerton. She has also worked as an instructor of Black and Brown Chicago-area youth each summer since 2015. Jenn has served as a Teaching Assistant for a number of quantitatively-oriented and substantive courses dating back to her undergraduate days in 2007 through her nearly a dozen teaching experiences at the University of Chicago. In line with her research, she has co-taught a number of courses at the intersections of race, gender, and sexuality. And, in spring 2019, she will teach her own stand-alone course called Black Americans, Gender, and the Politics of Group Threat. As a CCT Fellow, Jenn hopes to ease the transition as graduate students become instructors through inclusive teaching strategies.

  • Lara Janson

    CCT Fellow

    Lara is a PhD candidate in Sociology interested in researching intersections of inequality. Related research interests include gender and sexuality, race/ethnicity, crime/incarceration, the sociology of law, and social justice movements. Before studying at the University of Chicago, Lara researched interculturalism and gender as a Fulbright Scholar in the Andes, where she also taught courses at a men’s prison and in rural Indigenous/Afro- communities. After conducting street outreach and educational programs in juvenile detention centers for a non-profit in the United States, Lara studied Peace & Conflict as a Mitchell Scholar in Northern Ireland, where she helped develop an online course linking gender and peace/conflict. As a CCT Fellow, Lara hopes to facilitate interdisciplinary collaborations and programs that will improve inclusivity, diversity, and accessibility in classrooms at the University of Chicago.

  • Meghan Jarpe

    CCT Fellow

    Meghan is a PhD candidate in the School of Social Service Administration (SSA). Her research focuses on human services organizations and their position at the intersection of policy and practice, including the impacts of performance demands on organizational functioning, policies, and the experiences of the human services workforce and client populations. Her teaching experiences at SSA include serving as the lead instructor for courses on “Organizational Theory for Human Services” and “Research Methods,” and as a TA for “Inequality in Employment,” “Data for Policy Analysis and Management,” and “Economics for Social Welfare.” She has also mentored students as a tutor in statistical methods. As a CCT fellow, she hopes to influence and expand the systems in place to prepare doctoral students at SSA for their roles as teachers.

  • Sam Lasman

    CCT Fellow

    Sam is a PhD Candidate in the Department of Comparative Literature. His work focuses on the medieval literature of the Middle East and Western Europe. At UChicago, his teaching experiences have included serving as a teaching assistant in the Philosophy Department and as a language assistant for first-year Persian, and he will be teaching a self-designed course in Comparative Literature in Autumn 2018. As a CCT Fellow, he looks forward to working with other graduate students and faculty towards more incisive and inclusive approaches to literature pedagogy.

  • K. Supriya

    CCT Fellow

    Supriya is a PhD candidate in the Committee on Evolutionary Biology. She studies the effect of ants on the diversity pattern of songbirds along an elevational gradient in the eastern Himalaya. At the University of Chicago, Supriya worked as a TA for a basic entomology course and an environmental science course, and co-led a workshop on inclusive teaching in STEM. As a CCT Fellow, Supriya hopes to facilitate conversations among students in the biological sciences about inclusive teaching practices and dealing with controversial subjects such as evolution and climate change.

  • Gabe Velez

    CCT Fellow

    Gabe is a PhD candidate in Comparative Human Development at the University of Chicago. He is the Pozen Family Center for Human Rights Preceptor and Internship coordinator. His research focuses on adolescent development and the formation of ideas about citizenship, human rights, and peace amid conflict and post-conflict contexts. As an instructor at the University of Chicago, he teaches classes on psychology, development, and human rights. Before coming to graduate school, he taught high school English in New York City, Peru, and Colombia. He is excited to be a part of the Chicago Center for Teaching team. In this new role as a fellow, he is looking forward to learning and growing himself while supporting new graduate students’ own development as engaging, inclusive instructors.